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96% of iPhone users have opted out of app tracking since iOS 14.5 launched

According to new data released by analytics firm Flurry, only 4% of iPhone users in the U.S. have allowed app tracking since ATT’s launch.

96% of iPhone users have opted out of app tracking since iOS 14.5 launched

Ios 14.5 App Tracking Transparency Hero

Source: Christine Romero-Chan / iMore

Apple’s best that people want privacy has paid off in a big way.

According to new data from app analytics firm Flurry, only 4% of iPhone users in the United States have opted into app tracking since Apple released App Tracking Transparency as part of iOS 14.5. That number goes up a little when considering international users – 11% of users worldwide have allowed apps to track them.

Until now, apps have been able to rely on Apple’s Identifier for Advertiser (IDFA) to track users for targeting and advertising purposes. With the launch of iOS 14.5 this week, mobile apps now have to ask users who have upgraded to iOS 14.5 for permission to gather tracking data. With opt-in rates expected to be low,

Flurry Analytics, owned by Verizon Media, is used in over 1 million mobile applications, providing aggregated insights across 2 billion mobile devices per month. For this report, Flurry will be updating every weekday by 10am Pacific Standard Time the daily opt-in rate as well as the share of users that apps cannot ask to track (‘restricted’ status), both in the U.S. and worldwide, to keep you informed on the most industry-impacting iOS release to date.

Flurry App Tracking Opt In Rate May

Source: Flurry

App Tracking Transparency, which launched with iOS 14.5, is Apple’s new privacy feature that requires apps to ask permission to track you. Users can also turn off tracking for all apps by default.

App Tracking Transparency requires apps to get the user’s permission before tracking their data across apps or websites owned by other companies for advertising, or sharing their data with data brokers. Apps can prompt users for permission, and in Settings, users will be able to see which apps have requested permission to track so they can make changes to their choice at any time.

As more iPhone owners update to iOS 14.5, we’ll begin to better understand the average amount of users who opt-in and opt-out of app tracking. These first numbers, however, tell a very clear story – the vast majority of people want their privacy.

Have you opted out of app tracking?

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Just 4% of US iPhone Users Let Apps Track Them After iOS Update

Apple recently rolled out its highly anticipated App Tracking Transparency feature with iOS 14.5, which lets users decide whether apps track their activity for targeted advertising. Overwhelmingly, users seem happy to leave app tracking disabled. Just 4% of iPhone users in the U.S. have agreed to app tracking after updating their device, according to the latest data from Verizon-owned analytics firm Flurry.

Just 4% of US iPhone Users Let Apps Track Them After iOS Update

Apple recently rolled out its highly anticipated App Tracking Transparency feature with iOS 14.5, which lets users decide whether apps track their activity for targeted advertising. Overwhelmingly, users seem happy to leave app tracking disabled. Just 4% of iPhone users in the U.S. have agreed to app tracking after updating their device, according to the latest data from Verizon-owned analytics firm Flurry.

Worldwide, that figure jumps to 12%, a healthy increase but one that still doesn’t spell great news for companies like Facebook that sell targeting to advertisers by hoovering up user data. With iOS 14.5, if a user has app tracking requests enabled, then whenever they download or update an app, it has to ask permission before it can track their activity. And it’s clear most users are saying: “Nah.”

Users who want to turn off tracking altogether without rejecting permissions for each app individually can toggle “Allow Apps to Request Track” in the iPhone’s privacy settings. Since the update launched on April 26, Flurry’s data shows that, on average, about 3% of U.S. iOS users and 5% of international iOS users have restricted app tracking.

Flurry based its findings on a sample size of 2.5 million daily mobile active users with iOS 14.5 in the U.S. and a sample size of 5.3 million such users worldwide. According to the company, its analytics tool is installed in more than 1 million mobile applications and it aggregates data from about 2 billion devices per month.

As a vocal opponent of Apple’s new feature, Facebook has launched a sweeping fearmongering campaign to convince users that these privacy measures are, in fact, a bad thing. Facebook took out multiple full-page ads arguing that Apple’s feature will devastate small businesses that rely on its ad targeting services and warning that many free sites may have to start charging users money for subscriptions or in-app purchases. Other tech giants like Snapchat, Google, and Twitter have also said that, if the majority of users decide to forego app tracking, it will likely affect their bottom line.

Granted, this data is just our first glimpse at the response from users. iOS 14.5 has only been out for a little less than two weeks, and, given more time, we’ll likely gain a better understanding of the average number of users opting-in or opting-out of app tracking. But one thing’s crystal clear: People value their privacy. And if that means missing out on a few personalized ads, well, plenty of folks seem happy to make that sacrifice.

Gizmodo weekend editor. Freelance games reporter. Full-time disaster bi.

Is there anything similar for Android users?

How Apples latest iOS update could help Amazons growing ad business

Amazon’s advertising business is soaring, and Apple’s recent privacy changes will likely add more fuel to its growth.

How Apples latest iOS update could help Amazons growing ad business

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